Kandinsky

kandinsky

Kandinsky poster has a number of visual principles, it has a powerful Visual Hierarchy (Dominant, Sub-Dominant & Sub-ordinand). This poster has consistent relation to the International Typographic Style (also known as Swiss Style) it has cleanliness, readability and objectivity. It also seems to be following a mathematical grid, fonts chosen for the text are sans serif. There is also a clear sense of negative space which is taken for granted by many designers.

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Pop Art influence

Surfer Mag

Surfer Mag

Surfer Magazine designed by Carson, the bright use of primary colours are influenced by Pop Art. Some image manipulation on the background which he sort of gives it a decolorized retro look which is one of his recognized approach.

Blue

Blue Magazine

Blue Magazine

Blue was a travel magazine, founded in 1997 by Amy Schrier, and David Carson as the original designer. Its focus was on global adventure travel, It was published in New York and as of now is out of print, its last issue was February-March 2000.

Art with Type

Promotional poster series for a theater production  New York Shakespeare Festival

Promotional poster series for a theater production New York Shakespeare Festival

For more than thirty years Paula Scher has been at the front line of graphic design. She became iconic with her typography posters, much of it using a simple typeface. She was very much an influence to David Carson.

Everyone is Influenced!!!!

Hans-Rudolf Lutz (1939-1998)

Hans-Rudolf Lutz (1939-1998)

Hans-Rudolf Lutz became one of the most influential figures for Carson. He was a Swiss graphic designer who specialized in typography, and very retro graphic design. Carson attended Oregon College of Commercial Art and during that time had a new lease on life to work with the great Hans-Rudolf Lutz. His printed patterns produced art that became almost abstract expressionism, that could be presented at MoMa.

The End of Print

The End of Print (monograph)

The End of Print (monograph)

In 1995, Carson published a monograph called The End of Print. The title came from a comment made by British designer Neville Brody during a joint interview in London. Brody had said that Ray Gun symbolized “the end of print”; everything including type and design had been already done, so it was time to move on to a different form.